Give yourself a “hygge”…

Hygge: A heart-warming lesson from Denmark

A college has started teaching students the Danish concept of hygge – said to make homes nicer and people happier. But what exactly is it and is it exportable?

Sitting by the fire on a cold night, wearing a woolly jumper, while drinking mulled wine and stroking a dog – probably surrounded by candles. That’s definitely “hygge”.

Eating home-made cinnamon pastries. Watching TV under a duvet. Tea served in a china set. Family get-togethers at Christmas. They’re all hygge too.

The Danish word, pronounced “hoo-ga”, is usually translated into English as “cosiness”. But it’s much more than that, say its aficionados – an entire attitude to life that helps Denmark to vie with Switzerland and Iceland to be the world’s happiest country.

With up to 17 hours of darkness per day in the depths of winter, and average temperatures hovering around 0C, people spend more time indoors as a result, says Nilsson, meaning there’s greater focus on home entertaining.

“Hygge could be families and friends getting together for a meal, with the lighting dimmed, or it could be time spent on your own reading a good book,” she says. “It works best when there’s not too large an empty space around the person or people.” The idea is to relax and feel as at-home as possible, forgetting life’s worries.

Mix our cosy, lambswool throws with Gotlland sheepskin cushions and actually look forward to winter!

 

 

By Justin Parkinson BBC News Magazine
• 2 October 2015
• From the section Magazine Image copyright Thinkstock

 

 

 

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